Eid al-Adha

My daughters have a soft spot when it comes to cute farm animals… they do eat meat but they’re not into gyros, and cringe when I post anything from the UAE that has to do with a lamb sandwich.


But in the spirit of education, here goes…
Starting tomorrow, Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, will be celebrated by Muslims for four days. One of Islam’s holiest days, Eid al-Adha celebrates Abraham’s willingness to take his son’s life at the request of God. As the story goes, just as Abraham prepares to kill his son Ishmael (Isaac), he is told that his intent to carry out this act is proof enough that he loves God and, as such, is given a sheep to sacrifice instead. Today, Muslims continue the practice of sacrificing sheep (or camels or goats) in observance of Eid al-Adha. The week before Eid, many sheep are seen being transported in trucks (and even cars) on their final ride to the families’ homes.

PC: AJ

PC: AJ


The animals are ritualistically killed and the meat divided into thirds with equal shares given to 1) the family, 2) friends/neighbors/relatives, and 3) those in need.
At this time of year, thousands of Muslims also take part in the Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca. Participation in the Hajj at least once in a lifetime is a requirement of all Muslims who are physically and financially able to do so. Many people save for years to be able to experience this event.
For non-Muslims, Eid al-Adha will just be a nice 4-day weekend. As is typical here, many of the students already began their holiday earlier in the week; today we had a grand total of one dozen 10th, 11th, and 12th graders in attendance.
A few days ago, I asked the girls how their families celebrate Eid. Most times I wish I could extract more elaborate responses than I do, and this was no exception. Some are traveling to visit family; most seem to be having parties “in the home,” which is a popular phrase they use instead of saying “at home.” Many of the girls watch the animal slaughter take place, and since they probably have done so most of their lives, are not squeamish about this ritual as it holds extreme religious importance to them. They are focused on the communal aspect of Eid and are as excited as kids at Christmas, as gift giving (especially money) is also involved. The girls didn’t pass out gifts this year but last year I received a handmade keychain.

And here’s a window decoration at our school:

As for me, I’ll spend the long weekend in and around the area, eating camel burgers and lamb sandwiches, and will report back on the happenings.
Eid Mubarak, everyone!

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3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Vacay time again… | bettina without borders
  2. Barb
    Sep 23, 2015 @ 03:07:54

    Camel burger, maybe, but a camel milk shake, wtf??

    Like

    Reply

  3. Deb Mech
    Sep 23, 2015 @ 04:38:39

    I know you pretty well, and I’m pretty sure you are steering clear of the camel burgers and lammy sammy’s (just came up with that one on the spot!). Enjoy your long weekend anyway!

    Like

    Reply

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